March 2013


See on Scoop.itThe ICT and iPad Pilot

A group of teachers have started to disrupt their own textbook options by starting up an iBooks Author Hackathon. And it’s incredible.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

ThisIt’Isis one of those articles that should be part of the teachers’ Bible.

 

See on edudemic.com

See on Scoop.itThe ICT and iPad Pilot

“A few weeks ago I posted here a poster on iPad basics which many of you have downloaded to use with their students in the class. Today, I am sharing with you another great resource on iPad. This is not a graphic but a quick reference card on everything you and your students need to know about iPad. From the hardware to networking features , this little manual can serve as a leading guide to a better manipulation of  your iPad.
 I am not sure how much iPading you are doing in your classroom but whether you use iPad just occasionally or you adopt it as a consistent learning and teaching tool,  the reference card below will definitely give you a hand in improving your iPad use. I suggest that you share it with your students and go through it with them section by section and make sure they understand it before they start using their iPads again.

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

See on Scoop.itThe ICT and iPad Pilot

The digital revolution has only just begun.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

I think Greg is spot on with this statement:

"A room decked out with laptops and iPods with access to high-speed wireless broadband is not a rich learning environment on its own.

The interactions between teacher and students and between the students themselves bring the environment to life and present opportunities for the technology to be useful in learning. The tools that have the most impact are those that allow for interactivity."

That realy is the nub of the problem. Interactivity is sometimes a big step for teachers, particularly those who have a limited range of peadgogical strategies. What will haunt us for years willl be the under-investment in teaching professional development. What is there and effective is being driven by grass-roots enthusiasm.

See on www.smh.com.au

See on Scoop.itThe ICT and iPad Pilot

Ask3 is a free iPad app from TechSmith. TechSmith is probably best known as being the company that produces Jing and Camtasia screen capture software. Ask3 is a tool that teachers can use to create…

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

Thinking about Whitby’s article in today’s SMH: it’s not just the app. it’s the teaching brain behind it.

See on ipadapps4school.com

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

Some write tomatoes and some write tomato’s. In the face of confusion over correct usage of the wayward apostrophe, one English local council has decided to scrap it, at least in street names.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

I have to confess that the laziness and ignorance that surrounds the use of apostrophes is often a source of great irritation. I don’t get mad at students, although I bemoan the fact that they are so lacking in awareness of the importance of grammar and punctuation issues, usually because of poor teaching. Ironically, the reasons for this are a reliance on content (even in English, where the language of text is lost in a welter of interpretation), too much – no too little – student-centred learning, which prevents the teacher from getting down in the classroom to teach writing at the ‘pen-face’, and bad assessment practices.

 

We forget that, before formal assessment came along, kids were always writing, without the pressure attached to assessment. They were free to make mistakes and we were more empowered, if you like, to correct them. The in-class assessment task is the black death of good teaching: incredibly stressful for kids and of zero value in promoting the learning objectives of the class.

 

It all matters, and far more that some bloody task which simply apes the HSC…

See on rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

SYDNEY, March 13 � – Google is calling for major Australian educational reforms, warning that the economy will suffer unless more computer science graduates and digital entrepreneurs are produced.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

And so say all of us. Why aren’t we integrating these skills?

 

Answer: too many teachers are digital paranoids, far more than the ones that are digital immigrants. If you can’t integrate the technology, you no longer have the skills. How will you meet the AITSL standards?

See on ozteacher.com.au

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

There is an old Protestant joke that the ideal minister is a vigorous man (or woman) of 31 who has been married for 25 years and has four children. He preaches sermons of burning depth that last only 10 minutes and never offend anyone.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

It was black smoke this morning, so who knows where the spirit is moving. 

See on www.smh.com.au

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