May 2013


See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

Australian parents are increasingly choosing to spend more money on their children’s education.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

I love it! A very naughty and tongue in cheek article from Catherine Scott that points out what we all should know: that we can’t believe that private schools provide a better education, just a different education. In my experience, it’s not the academic standards that cause parents to send their children to independent schools (and I leave systemic schools out of this because they are in a different category). The children come to these schools for the range of co-educational opportunities, the philosophy of the school (which is hopefully lived out!) and because they want their children to be like the school’s students who they see down the street. And that, in some ways, is as it should be.

See on theconversation.com

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

A million students sat down yesterday for the first day of the three-day National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). It wouldn’t help to tell them that one day they will wonder at all the fuss their parents and teachers are making.

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

The SMH is taking a rather optimisit view of the NAPLAN tests, but I remain convinced that we could assess the nation’s literacy and numeracy (and maybe more) at the school level without mass testing. The money saved could provide teachers with diagnostic tools that gave far quicker feedback and a more finely focused diagnosis of student need.

See on www.smh.com.au

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

We are about to produce a generation of children who are worse off than their parents. What a disgrace!

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

I particularly liked this article because I found it on the business pages of the Sydney Morning Herald. One of my chief gripes about business is its expecation that the education system will produce grist for its employment mill, but consistently refuses to make an equitable contribution to the national finances so that it can be paid for. National investment means that everyone has to pay; and if that means that themillions invested by business in tax avoidance is redirected into health, education, disability insurance and paid materanity leave – all of which contriubte to a more productive and effective workforce– then so be it.

See on www.smh.com.au

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

Jeff goes off in Mrs. Phung!! check out his news interview here follow link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSxElvdd0R4 THIS IS THE ORIGINAL ALL OTHERS ARE CO…

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

Oh! Three cheers for this kid. He is so spot on. Everyone one of us in the profession should look at this and beg for forgiveness for everyday we have walked in a ‘handed out a package’. This kid even understands differentation!

See on www.youtube.com

See on Scoop.itReligion

Jack Persico: The new pope fights poverty and complacency wherever he sees it. He could be a superhero even for an atheist like me

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

It’s interesting how Francis has been able to generate this enthusiasm, even though his actions are still mainly symbolic. The hope is, I suppose, that he reminds the secular West that Christianity still has considerable moral power; and that he reminds Catholics that the most important commandments have nothing to do with prohibitions on sexual behaviour.

See on www.guardian.co.uk

See on Scoop.itReligion

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

A vastly amusing quiz and one that is bound to confuse. Naturally, I came out as a Catholic liberal!

See on quizfarm.com

See on Scoop.itLearning, Teaching, Leading

Some thoughts on teachers, students and the Future of Education. If there’s a bookish child in your life, you should get them a copy of The Way Things Work: …

Christopher Bounds‘s insight:

Well, I could be a spoil sport and say that this utopic vision will never come to be; but I’m actually in no doubt that the future of learning is going to be based around the intelligent agent on some smart digital device. What I don’t think this means is the death of the teaching profession. It means we are free to be what we do best: mentor, care and grow our students. The other thing that such projects ignore is a great deal of the research on the relative advantages of direct instruction and socialised learning. Digital Aristotle will provide a flexible learning environment, but the essence of learning is disequilibrium. Unless the program goes outside the learning comfort zone, learning will not be faster, just more ‘personalised’. There will be a balance struck!

See on www.youtube.com

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